Multicenter, USA - 30 Jan `16Incyte: Topical Ruxolitinib for the Treatment of Vitiligo

Official Title: Topical Ruxolitinib for the Treatment of Vitiligo

In Brief: The purpose of this study is to determine if topical ruxolitinib 1.5% will provide repigmentation in vitiligo lesions.

Description: The hypothesis is that JAK inhibitors can also successfully treat vitiligo. Lesional skin of both alopecia areata and vitiligo primarily contain T cells in a TH1 response as opposed to a mixed cell infiltrate such as in psoriasis or lichen planus. Both alopecia areata and vitiligo are TH1 mediated diseases dependent on the production of IFN-gamma to drive the response. CD8+ T cells are both necessary and sufficient for melanocyte destruction in vitiligo (van den Boorn JG et al 2009) and CD8+NKG2D+ T cells are also necessary and sufficient for hair loss in alopecia areata (Gilhar A et al 2013).

Ages Eligible: 18 Years and older

Start Date: January 2016

Completion Date (estimated): February 2017

Status: Completed

Study ID from ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02809976 
Other Study ID Numbers: I-18424-15-06 

Location: multicenter, USA

Contact: To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact David Rosmarin, MD at Tufts Medical Center. Please refer to this study by its NCT number.

FAQOther Questions

  • Will it spread?

    Vitiligo activity may vary considerably from person to person. In a good number of patients the disease goes on for 3-4 years and then it settles down, with one or two stubborn...

  • Which skin conditions can be mistaken for vitiligo?

    Vitiligo is a common skin condition with characteristic milky white patches of irregular shape. However, several other skin conditions exhibit similar symptoms that can lead to ...

  • Does halo nevi affect vitiligo development?

    Halo nevi — nevi with an depigmented circle around it, usually on the trunk — are about 10x more common in vitiligo patients than in the general population, especially in childr...