FAQ

  • Vitiligo can be puzzling for a child because a person who has it isn't "ill" in a common sense.  To choose the right words to explain vitiligo diagnosis to a child, first consider their age and modify the conversation to make it age-appropriate. The following tips can help yo...
  • Treatment results will vary by person and type of vitiligo. The rule of thumb is that you will need to allow at least 3 to 6 months before you begin to see results from any treatment, and you may expect satisfactory results within 12-18 months. Newly appeared spots can be eff...
  • Despite the dearth of medications available to treat psoriasis - a disease with similar prevalence numbers and impact on quality of life - vitiligo has no known cure or specific treatments. Few therapies can reduce or stop vitiligo symptoms for prolonged periods of time, but n...
  • Pyrostegia venusta is a neotropical evergreen vine widely spread in Brazil throughout fields, at the coast, edge of the woods and along roadsides (see photo below). Popularly known as “flame vine” or “cipó-de-são-joão”, this species is cultivated due to its outstanding ornamen...
  • Traditional medicines may be helpful in chronic, metabolic, and stress-related conditions early in the disease manifestation, before extensive tissue and organ damage has occurred. Vitiligo is not high on this list.  Only for a very few traditional treatments is there any evi...
  • Most of health insurance companies will initially reject claims for vitiligo doctor visits or phototherapy treatments but with enough efforts you can have a substantial part of related expenses covered by insurance.  Have your dermatologist write a letter to the insurance ...
  • Extracts of the tropical fern Polypodium leucotomos appear to have beneficial properties for the vitiligious skin. Polypodium leucotomos (also classified as Polypodium aureum) and Polypodium decumanum (also classified as Phlebodium decumanum) are indigenous to the Honduran rai...
  • It’s important to remember there are multiple factors involved in vitiligo onset, including genetic predisposition, living and working environments, and exposure to certain chemicals. Some products may be harmful for some patients but not others. There are a number of commerc...
  • The drug Scenesse from Clinuvel has been tested in clinical trials for vitiligo, in combination with narrowband UVB. The new drug acts as an anti-oxidant and activates melanin in skin, which in turn increases pigmentation of the skin. Researchers noticed faster and better re...
  • In a recent study researchers assessed effect and safety of different laser and phototherapy treatments, such as excimer laser/light, narrowband UVB, UVA and PUVA. No significant difference was found between excimer laser and its cheaper alternative NB-UVB in the treatment of...
  • If you are starting a new job and you are concerned about stares and questions about your skin, try a proactive approach. When the time is right and you are feeling comfortable, broach the topic in an open way. Chances are, your new co-workers will understand you without extra...
  • Ginkgo Biloba seems to be a simple, safe, inexpensive and fairly effective therapy for vitiligo. It is mostly effective in halting the progression of the disease. It can also speed up repigmentation process in some patients.  Ginkgo Biloba leaf extract is known to have anti-i...
  • Many celebrities have dealt with vitiligo while remaining in the public eye, maintaining a positive outlook, and having a successful career. Here are a few courageous famous people who face vitiligo in the public eye >>>
  • Contrary to popular belief, vitiligo is not a cosmetic disorder but a systemic disease affecting the largest body organ and other vital systems. For more than 1.6 million people in the US affected by vitiligo, it is far more than just a skin condition. Many people experience...
  • It's very unlikely. We have specifically looked into claims that gluten-free diet may ease symptoms of vitiligo, or completely reverse it, and found no firm scientific evidence to support this theory. Gluten is a storage protein in wheat, rye, and barley that puffs up when ba...
  • Scientists know that some people are genetically predisposed to a specific group of autoimmune diseases – including generalized vitiligo – but do not know who and why.It doesn’t really help knowing you may be ‘at risk’ of developing a disease – because you never know if or whe...
  • A well-trained dermatologist should be able to diagnose vitiligo and distinguish it from contact leukoderma or more than twenty other conditions with similar skin appearance based on physical examination, assisted with a Wood’s lamp. Occasionally, your doctor may recommend so...
  • We have specifically looked into claims that some food supplements or special diet may ease symptoms of vitiligo, or completely reverse it, and found no firm scientific evidence to support this theory. It does not mean there is no possible link between vitiligo and nutrition,...
  • Vitiligo activity may vary considerably from person to person. In a good number of patients the disease goes on for 3-4 years and then it settles down, with one or two stubborn patches and the clearance of the others.  There are also patients where the disease shows periods ...
  • Vitiligo is NOT contagious. It cannot be passed on or caught from touching someone with vitiligo, shaking hands, swimming in the same pool, sharing towels, sitting next to someone in sauna, using the same sporting equipment, or eating food prepared by a person who has vitiligo.
  • Vitiligo (pronounced vit-ill-EYE-go) is a relatively common skin disease characterized by smooth, white, painless spots or patches on various parts of the body and hairs above it.  Contrary to popular belief, vitiligo is not a cosmetic disorder but a systemic disease affectin...
  • There is no cure for vitiligo, but there are a number of effective treatment options that can be discussed with your GP or dermatologist. The aim of treatment is to stop new patches forming and bring the color back. In approximately 70% of all cases vitiligo condition can be s...
  • It is true that vitiligo progression could be stopped in 4 out of 5 cases by the use of potent systemic corticosteroids - that is, oral medications. However, systemic corticosteroids might have possible side effects, hence, the decision of their use for limiting vitiligo pr...
  • Children born to parents who both have the disorder are more likely to develop vitiligo. However, most children will not get vitiligo even if one parent has it. In children with focal and segmental vitiligo, there is often no family history of vitiligo or other autoimmune dis...
  • Surprisingly, the causes of vitiligo are yet to be precisely established. Researchers know the cause is pre-wired in your genes, just waiting for a bad luck moment. In about half of all cases this can be a specific trigger or an unfortunate combination of benign conditions. In...

FAQOther Questions

  • How long does it take to treat vitiligo?

    Treatment results will vary by person and type of vitiligo. The rule of thumb is that you will need to allow at least 3 to 6 months before you begin to see results from any trea...

  • Will it spread?

    Vitiligo activity may vary considerably from person to person. In a good number of patients the disease goes on for 3-4 years and then it settles down, with one or two stubborn...

  • Can Ginkgo Biloba help with vitiligo?

    Ginkgo Biloba seems to be a simple, safe, inexpensive and fairly effective therapy for vitiligo. It is mostly effective in halting the progression of the disease. It can also sp...