FAQWhich diseases most commonly accompany vitiligo?

FAQ

According to a 10-year study, vitiligo patients have a statistically significant higher prevalence of other autoimmune conditions and dermatological disorders:

  • hypothyroidism
  • multiple sclerosis
  • rheumatoid arthritis
  • idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura
  • seronegative arthritis
  • pernicious anemia
  • myasthenia gravis
  • inflammatory bowel disease
  • lymphoma, and
  • systemic lupus erythematosus.
  • type 1 and type 2 diabetes
  • alopecia areata
  • psoriasis
  • chronic urticaria
  • Guillain-Barre syndrome
  • linear morphea
  • ulcerative colitis
  • celiac disease
  • Raynaud’s disease
  • sarcoid
  • Crohn’s disease
  • dermatitis herpetiformis
  • Addison’s disease, and
  • Sjögren syndrome.

Most patients with vitiligo will not develop autoimmune disease, but a significant minority will develop hypothyroidism. 

Rates of comorbid autoimmune diseases vary by race and sex. Black patients had the highest rate (16.4%), followed by:

  • white (16.3%),
  • Hispanic (15.7%), and
  • Asian patients (7.9%-8.4%).

They are more prevalent in women (17.7%) compared with men (6.7%).

Being aware of conditions that may occur along with vitiligo is important for patients and their caretakers. If you live with multiple disorders, it is important that your doctor is aware of all drugs and medications you are taking, to ensure they don't interfere with each other. 

Suggested reading: Which skin conditions can be mistaken for vitiligo?

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