Events - 21 Sep 08:41High-level Meeting on the Asian and Pacific Decade of People With Disabilities

Event

Beijing, China

The UN's Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP), in cooperation with the China Disabled Persons Federation (CDPF), is organizing the High-level Intergovernmental Meeting on the Midpoint Review of the Asian and Pacific Decade of Persons with Disabilities, 2013-2022, in Beijing from 27 November to 1 December 2017.

Objectives of the Meeting are:

  • To undertake a midpoint review of the progress made, including gaps and challenges, in the implementation of the Asian and Pacific Decade of Persons with Disabilities, 2013-2022, and the Incheon Strategy to Make the Right Real for Persons with Disabilities in Asia and the Pacific;
  • To discuss the future policy direction for building disability-inclusive societies in Asia and the Pacific, bearing in mind the synergies between the Incheon Strategy and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development as well as the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities;
  • To consider and adopt an outcome document to accelerate the implementation of the Incheon Strategy for the remainder of the Decade.
The Meeting will comprise two segments: (a) a senior officials segment, to be held from 27 to 29 November 2017; and (b) a ministerial segment, to be held on 30 November and 1 December 2017.

The Meeting is to be held in pursuance of the Commission resolution 69/13 of 1 May 2013 on the Implementation of the Ministerial Declaration on the Asian and Pacific Decade of Persons with Disabilities, 2013-2022, and the Incheon Strategy to Make the Right Real for Persons with Disabilities in Asia and the Pacific.

The Meeting is taking place at a critical juncture when ESCAP member States and associate members are striving to build more inclusive societies at a time of global economic uncertainties and rising inequality, and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development provides a unique opportunity to leave no one behind in development, and to support disability-inclusive development across Asia and the Pacific.

FAQOther Questions

  • I have vitiligo: will my children have vitiligo, too?

    Children born to parents who both have the disorder are more likely to develop vitiligo. However, most children will not get vitiligo even if one parent has it. In children wit...

  • Is it Bitiligo? Vitaligo? Veteligo?

    There are so many different ways that people try and spell or even pronounce Vitiligo.  Here are some common mis-spellings: bitiligo, vitigo, vitaligo, vitilago, vitiglio, vita...

  • Can chemicals cause vitiligo?

    It’s important to remember there are multiple factors involved in vitiligo onset, including genetic predisposition, living and working environments, and exposure to certain chem...